Careers After Sport

Sportsmen and sportswomen actively involved in a sporting career have to juggle work, life and sport. Moving On can help create a more sustainable, balanced approach, giving the athlete the energy to pursue their field, as well as time to plan for the future

‘The work I have done with Kevin has helped me to prioritise…my future would have remained indecisive with so many different options clouding what I really wanted from life. Kevin helped me to take control…helping me to unearth my priorities in all aspects of my life.’

PAUL SAMSON, ENGLAND RUGBY INTERNATIONAL AND PREMIERSHIP PLAYER

Sportsmen and sportswomen have wonderful but short careers, usually ending in their early thirties, when the rest of us are getting into a comfortable mid-term stride. For athletes, it can take a while to get back into the pace of life after their sporting career ends.

Cristina Versari, head of sports psychology at San Diego University, says, ‘When an athlete retires it takes four to eight years to adjust to a new life.’ Yet with careful planning the sportsperson can finish first.

BENEFITS OF CAREER COACHING

  • Early planning for post-sporting life helps to take the pressure off the sportsperson. Instead of being distracted by reaching the end of their career and not knowing what to do next, the athlete can focus on their game, secure in the knowledge that they have planned ahead wisely. This foresight can only improve their game.
  • Injuries can unexpectedly cut a career short. Planning can also help prepare mentally for such an eventuality
  • Careful financial planning enables the sportsperson to invest while earning a regular income. This may entail some extra work while still on the field, but the pay-off in future life is well worth it
  • Emotional planning is just as vital. They might already have an idea of their future, but an idea is not enough. An outside professional’s experience can help individuals figure out how to use their own ideas to their advantage so they can make good choices to support their goals, and to ‘stay the course’ so new skills become new habits.
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